Monthly Archives: January 2013

Wandsworth Against Cuts & Occupy activists defend Battersea adventure playground

This is a collaborative story worked on with those occupying Battersea Park adventure playground. This playground isn’t just any old playground – watch this 10 min film to find out why. Hopefully the collaboration between locals and Occupy activists will work as well here as it has at Friern Barnet library… and will make Wandsworth council see sense and stop the demolition.

UPDATE 5.30pm Mon 7 Jan:

The defenders of Battersea adventure playground have been told that demolition will begin next Monday. Occupiers are remaining in situ; a small camp (maximum 15 residents) has been set up inside the playground, with supporters visiting during the day.

Within the last hour police appeared to be chaining up the entrances to the playground, stating that anyone who left would not be able to return. This would have cut off Occupiers from toilets and food supplies. Protesters reminded officers that this is a lawful protest and campaigners report that the police then “backed off.”

Police have, however, closed the neighbouring and active young children’s playground, stating that the banners – some of which the children themselves made – would frighten playground users.  The information table set up by Wandsworth Against Cuts is being cited as a hazard.

K, currently at the Occupy camp inside the playground, asks: “Is this Wandsworth council trying to quash popular support? I saw these tactics used in the Goldsmiths’ occupation a couple of years ago.  The university shut the library during an exam period, claiming that we made such a mess the place was unusable – essentially turning people against us.”

It seems that as yet local people are behind the occupation as they want to save the playground and have run out of other ways to convince Wandsworth council to rethink. According to one occupier at the site: “Parents have ignored the chains on the little kids’ play area, lifting their children over to let them play.”

Original Story

Members of the Occupy community and local anti-cuts activists occupied the Battersea Park Adventure Playground on Saturday 5 January, in protest at Wandsworth council’s decision to have a unique children’s facility demolished. The action was taken in support of local groups who have been working to save the playground for months. Bulldozers are due on the site on Monday 7 Jan.

Local resident Michael McCarthy said: “I think it’s terrible. I brought my daughter here today to see for myself what is happening. I think it’s great someone is fighting these cuts. Where are the kids going to go? There is nowhere else.”

Qualified staff at this popular and historic playground have provided a stimulating and safe environment for thousands of children for decades. The playground staff have helped teenagers from the local area, including the large Doddington, Ethelburga and Surrey Lane Estates, to grow up free from gang and drug related pressures. They have organised cultural, social and educational activities which have helped young people develop confidence and independence. The older kids have helped to build the playground, learning useful skills and enjoying a sense of achievement and ownership through doing so.

In recent months staff have been laid off and the playground has been closed, as unsupervised use is considered dangerous. The council’s plan is to extend the adjacent, conventional playground into the adventure play area and convert it to a static, unstaffed facility. This will only be suitable for younger children, supervised by parents. Campaigners report seeing council factsheets showing that the cost of staffing playgrounds in Wandsworth is only £2 per household per year. Those occupying the play area call on Wandsworth council to reverse the decisions to get rid of play staff and to destroy the adventure playground.

Norman MacLean of Wandsworth Against Cuts (WAC) said “Please support this occupation by visiting the playground, bringing food and other supplies and, if possible, by joining us in defending this vital community resource.”

Location: Battersea Park, SouthWest corner near junction of Albert Bridge Road and Prince of Wales Drive. SW11 4SF

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Protests for a New Year

It’s feeling more and more like the 90’s all over again (but with fewer smiley-face t-shirts, more Northern Soul, less Acid House). Back then it was poll tax riots, Castlemorton, the Newbury Bypass protest camp, Reclaim the Streets, GM crop trashings and the Global Justice movement (dubbed ‘anti-globalisation’ by the media).

In 2013, it’s like this:

Protesting against the Bexhill-Hastings link road, Combe Haven Defenders are holed up in tunnels and enjoying the views of the valley in sturdy treehouses. There’s a ground-level camp too, a camp-kitchen and compost loo. They’re looking for support, of the live-in and drop-by variety – check the link for background, directions and wishlist.

GM foods are also looking like making a comeback; corporate lobbyists are desperate for the cash and it’s got nothing to do with feeding the needy. Check The Ecologist and GMWatch for details of why GMO’s still aren’t a good idea (and these bits I co-wrote for the OT last year).

Idle No More and the Zapatistas are rising in the Americas.

Info wars are ongoing over tar sands, fracking and nuclear power.

We need sustainable, renewable energy; technology appropriate to weather patterns, geography and demography; lots of community micro-generation; massive investment in wind, solar and hydro; and a total rethink on everyone’s part about consumption.

Infinite growth on a finite planet (still) can’t work.

And then there’s One Billion Rising.

Vandana Shiva said: “Ending violence against women includes moving beyond the violent economy shaped by capitalist patriarchy”. Think she’s right.

The ‘99% and 1%’ rhetoric of the Occupy mic check, the subversive ‘Round Dance Revolution’ of First Nations groups in Canada and the US, the silent march of the Zapatistas – with their “did you hear it?” message and communique, the storming of Delhi’s official buildings by women sick of oppression, and the treehouses of those opposing road building and oil pipelines… It’s all part of the same struggle against a teetering system that we can no longer afford to prop up or ignore.

Indigenous people, women, traditional farmers, environmentalists, and those who love and live on the land – we are the majority. Add in all those struggling to make ends meet because our governments serve corporations and the power-hungry rather than the people… and this is the makings of a global mass movement for real change.

We need more people to get involved. There’s lots to do – check out the links in this and see if you can add your voice or assistance.

2013: The Year of the People

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Legal Challenge to UK’s ‘Nature Watchdog’

This is a Ban The Burn update.

Campaigners are asking the European Commission to investigate a potential misuse of European funding by Natural England (NE), the UK’s nature watchdog.

A representative of the Ban The Burn campaign, based in Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, will travel to Brussels on 10 January to meet officials from the Commission’s Environmental Compliance Unit.

Legal reviews are being requested due to:

  • Natural England’s decision to drop its prosecution of Walshaw Moor Estate (WME). In March this year, Natural England took WME to court because of 43 environmental infringements on its 4000 hectare grouse moor estate above Hebden Bridge. The case was dropped abruptly for reasons that have not been made public.
  • The subsequent £2.5 million “Higher Level Stewardship” agreement between NE and WME. This amounts to £1,000 of public money every working day for the next 10 years, while allowing the continued burning of blanket bog – a European priority habitat. Activities which were previously considered prosecutable are now being subsidised by the tax-payer and European funding.

The legal basis for the campaigners’ challenge is that European funding for nature protection should not be used to subsidise activities likely to degrade an extremely sensitive and valuable habitat.

The EU Birds Directive and EU Habitats Directive are both designed to protect environments such as that at Walshaw Moor. Hebden Bridge was very badly hit by flooding in the summer of 2012 and the agreement between NE and WME fails to recognise the downstream effects of current management practices. In order to minimise flood risk in the town, the upland catchment needs to be managed so that large areas of degraded blanket bog are restored to a healthy state, with a good cover of sphagnum moss to act as a buffer slowing the run-off during heavy rainfall.

Local campaigner Dongria Kondh explained that “On Walshaw Moor, we have seen erosion from unconsented tracks, very extensive drainage and aggressive burning on blanket bog. The increased scale of this activity over the past few years may well have been a contributory factor to the severity of flooding in our town. Instead of being banned, these activities are now being subsidised.”

Dr. Aidan Foley BA, Msc., Phd, FGS, an environmental scientist who has helped the group to compile data for the complaint, added “Sphagnum is particularly vulnerable to fire, so continued burning is widely recognised as detrimental. Such damage to the structure of the soil will prevent this degraded moorland being restored to a healthy state.”

Although Ban The Burn is a locally based campaign, it is not just a local issue. Degraded peatlands turn from being carbon sinks to becoming carbon sources; according to the Commission of Inquiry on Peatlands, damaged UK peatlands currently release almost 3.7 million tonnes of CO2 a year – more than all the households in Edinburgh, Cardiff and Leeds combined.

 

Please share this story widely.

For more information, contact bantheburn2012@gmail.com, or ring Dongria Kondh on 07847 815 926 (if there is no reply, leave a text message and you will  be called back).

A Press Release and photographs will be issued on 10 January following the meeting between Ban The Burn campaigner Dongria Kondh and Jean-François Brakeland, head of Environment Compliance for the European Commission.

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Changes

For the last year, The Occupied Times – a creative alternative to the mainstream media, born of the OccupyLSX camp – has been my priority. Writing, commissioning, editing, researching, plotting with co-editors and distributing newspapers has occupied me pretty much dusk to dawn and dawn to dusk.  The OT came before my festival and hostel work, pushed friends and family to the sidelines, seemed more important than cooking and sleeping and paltry things like that.

My sojourn in the OT newsroom exercised brain muscles I didn’t know I possessed. I gleefully inserted commas and deleted apostrophes, proof-reading deep into the wee hours as deadlines approached. In the early days, while living in the Occupy camp at St Paul’s, I’d take my netbook to an all-night cafe near Smithfield Market and type through the night, sustained by mugs of stewed tea.

I was drawn to the OT because I love writing and think information dissemination is one of the most vital aspects of a social movement, campaign or protest. I stayed because it was a great learning experience, because creating indymedia seemed a valid and valuable thing to spend my time doing, and because I liked the spiky, funny, rebellious OT crew. In the early days, diversity of perspective and opinion was lapped up and newcomers were encouraged to dive in at the deep end, to question everything and to throw half-formed ideas into the pot at every opportunity.

I quit the OT in the run-up to this Solstice / Apocalypse / Christmas. I’m appreciating the time I now have on my hands … although I can’t call it ‘free’ time, as the things I’ve neglected have greedily swallowed it up.

It has been an inspiring, educational, exhausting journey. In the end, I quit not to get my life back – although that’s a welcome side-effect – but because as time went on I found myself increasingly often on a different ‘page’ to the majority (but not all) of our informal collective. Agreeing-to-disagree could only carry us so far before the necessity of diverging became apparent.

I’m grieving, a little, for the people I worked and laughed and debated intensely with; and for the part of my identity that became tangled up with this OT thing I did. I’m saddened by what I perceive as a narrowing of focus within the OT, although I’ll still be eager to read the first 2013 issue when it comes out.

Everything changes.

This year I think I’ll be focusing on co-operatives, the commons, radical community initiatives, eco-literacy and energy choices and I’ll be trying to convince people of the necessity of moving away from cultures based on capitalism, growth and profit.

I’ll be supporting the Diggers2012, the Combe Haven Defenders road protest camp, Stop Hinkley‘s anti-nuclear blockades and Hebden Bridge’s Ban the Burn actions, and will continue to fight the disaster that is GM crops.

I’ll be helping to spread the word about Radical Routes (a network of co-operatives working towards radical social change) and will probably be involved in The Green Gathering (website under construction).

I’ll be fighting the corporatisation of communities, as people in Barnet, Totnes and Frome are doing (especially my own, in Hebden Bridge, where we’re being threatened with a supermarket); and I’ll be educating myself by listening to people like Kevin Anderson (Rob Hopkins of Transition Network interviewed Anderson and I was inspired).

I’ll continue my involvement with the Occupy movement, which I believe still has power and potential, particularly in its networks of people, affinity groups and communication channels, and in its hands-on experience of organising camps and providing for basic needs in adverse conditions (see Occupy Wall Street activists organising disaster relief after Hurricane Sandy).

I’ll still be writing, and encouraging others to write.

I’ll hopefully have time to grow some fruit and veg this year too, and if Iain Findlay (the OccuPied Piper) is successful with crowdfunding his Whirligro – a simple invention for growing food in urban environments –  I’ll have a bumper salad crop.

Here’s hoping for some breakthroughs in tackling social, economic and environmental injustice and violence this year.

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